At the same time as unveiling its new many-core processors - including the freshly reviewed Core i9-7980XE - Intel has formally announced its 8th Generation Core family for mainstream desktops, which will be available to buy from early October.

Featuring what Intel calls its 'best gaming processor ever,' the 8th Generation Core processor range includes new options for multiple cores in mainstream desktops: The new Core i3 range includes the first quad-core processor to bear the name, while the new Core i5 range adds the first six-core chip. At the top of the tree, though, is the part with which Intel is targeting gamers: The Intel Core i7-8700K, which runs at a 3.7GHz base clock jumping up to a peak 4.7GHz single-core Turbo Boost Technology 2.0 speed, features six cores and 12 threads, 12MB of Intel Smart Cache, dual-channel DDR4-2666 memory support, and a 95W thermal design profile (TDP) for a price of $359 per unit in trays of 1,000 (around £265 excluding taxes). This chip, Intel claims, means a 25 percent boost in frames per second (FPS) in gaming and 45 percent improved 'mega-tasking' - as measured by the PlayerUnknown's Battleground Mega-Tasking Gaming Scenario, the company claims - compared to the quad-core, eight-thread seventh-generation Core i7-7700K which it replaces.

Elsewhere, the range is as follows: the Core i3-8100, a four-core four-thread part running at 3.6GHz with no Turbo Boost support, 6MB of Smart Cache, dual-channel DDR4-2400 support, and a 65W TDP at a 1K-tray price of $117 (around £87 excluding taxes); the Core i3-8350K ups the speed to 4GHz and offers support for overclocking at a 91W TDP and a $168 1K-tray price (around £124 excluding taxes); the Core i5-8400 has six cores and six threads running at a base clock of 2.8GHz and a single-core Turbo Boost speed of up to 4GHz, 9MB of Smart Cache, dual-channel DDR4-2666 support, and a 65W TDP at $182 (around £135 excluding taxes); the Core i5-8600K ups the base speed to 3.6GHz and the Turbo Boost peak to 4.3GHz, unlocks the chip for overclocking, and increases the TDP to 95W for $257 (around £190 excluding taxes); and the Intel Core i7-8700 has the same six cores and 12 threads of its flagship stablemate but running at a slower 3.2GHz base and 4.6GHz Turbo in a 65W TDP at $303 (around £224 excluding taxes). Retail pricing will, naturally, be higher in all cases.

The new chips will be available worldwide from October 5th, Intel has confirmed, with the first original equipment manufacturer (OEM) boxes to feature the parts arriving before the end of the year.


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