Intel launches new Xeon Processor W workstation CPUs

August 30, 2017 // 10:57 a.m.

Tags: #amd #intel #intel-xeon #intel-xeon-w #ryzen-threadripper #threadripper #workstation #xeon #xeon-processor-scalable #xeon-scalable-processor #xeon-w

Intel has officially launched a range of new parts in the Intel Xeon W family, targeting single-core workstations and offering up to 18 cores and 36 threads (18c/36t) - and which will be going toe-to-toe with AMD's rival Threadripper and Epyc parts.

The new Xeon W family, oddly enough, is not based on the Xeon Scalable Processor design announced earlier this year with a new mesh-style architecture and first available in server-centric-flavours. While the company has confirmed the launch of Xeon Scalable parts with one- and two-socket top-end workstations in mind, offering up to 28 cores per socket, the Xeon W range lacks the Scalable mesh architecture and dual-socket support in favour of a focus on lower-cost single-socket systems and reuse of the older Skylake microarchitecture on a 14nm process node in place of the new Skylake-X.

The Xeon W range's flagship model is the Xeon W-2195 which includes 18 cores and 36 threads (18c/36t) running at a 2.3GHz base frequency and 4.3GHz turbo frequency, 24.75MB of unified cache, and a 140W thermal design profile (TDP). The entry point, meanwhile, is the Xeon W-2123, which is a four-core eight-thread (4c/8t) part running at 3.6GHz base and 3.9GHz turbo with 8.25MB of cache in a 120W TDP. From there the models go to 6c/12t, 8c/16t, and 10c/20t. Each supports up to 512GB of DDR4 memory across four memory channels with ECC support, includes 48 PCI Express lanes, and includes the usual raft of Intel technologies - but not, it must be noted, support for the company's 3D XPoint-based Optane solid-state storage-cum-memory boards.

Intel has confirmed partnerships with companies including Dell, HP, Lenovo, and Fujitsu to launch workstations based on the Xeon W parts, while the specifications suggest they may also find their way into Apple's upcoming iMac hardware refresh. Retail pricing has yet to be confirmed, with Intel setting recommended customer pricing at $294 to $1,440 for the 4c/8t to 10c/20t models (around £227 to £1,111 respectively, excluding taxes) and pricing for the flagship 18c/36t part not yet available.


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