Cooler Master MasterKeys Lite L Combo RGB Review

July 19, 2016 | 09:00

Tags: #gaming-keyboard #gaming-mouse #make-it-yours #optical-mouse

Companies: #cooler-master

We turn our attention now to the mouse side of the bundle. It actually has an ambidextrous shape, but in left-handed use you'll miss out on the two thumb buttons. It has six buttons in total, an optical sensor and weighs in at 91g excluding the cable, which puts it firmly in average territory.

Cooler Master MasterKeys Lite L Combo RGB Review
Click to enlarge

Like the keyboard, the mouse has a fixed 1.8m rubber USB cable for connection to your PC, although this time around it's got some reinforcement. You also get a trio of smooth Teflon feet, and a matt, UV-coated top cover – all in all the materials and build quality are solid.

Cooler Master MasterKeys Lite L Combo RGB Review
Click to enlarge

The sensor is the Avago 3050, an optical model which here has four usable DPI levels – 500, 1,000, 2,000 and 3,500. These are cycled through on-the-fly with the DPI toggle behind the scroll wheel, which flashes a different colour for each different level. Mostly, we found it to be a very accurate sensor with no detectable acceleration and no issues with angle snapping or jitter. The only potential issue is the lift-off distance, which is around the height of three CDs – higher than we're used to.

The MasterKeys Lite L mouse doesn't have rubber side sections but nonetheless grip is okay and the main surface isn't too smooth. The shape, especially for an ambidextrous design, is also pretty comfortable to wield – we found that something between claw and palm grips worked best, and there were no major areas of discomfort.

Cooler Master MasterKeys Lite L Combo RGB Review Cooler Master MasterKeys Lite L Combo RGB Review
Click to enlarge

The two main buttons have a lovely, balanced action thanks to the Omron switches beneath them. We also had no issues with the TTC Encoder scroll wheel – it's securely housed, has clear notches and decent grip from its rubber surface and the click action is fine too. The DPI button is a little small but still relatively easy to use. However, we do think the thumb buttons need improving – they're very much on the thin side (maybe to stop them being a nuisance to left-handed players, but still) and have quite a spongy action. We also found that in some positions, it's possible to click the back button without it actually actuating. We had to adjust by clicking a bit harder than usual to ensure it worked properly all the time – not the end of the world, but still something that needs work.

Cooler Master MasterKeys Lite L Combo RGB Review
Click to enlarge

Like the keyboard, the mouse has an onboard RGB lighting system, although this time it's somewhat simpler. It has two separate zones – the scroll wheel and a thin strip at the rear – but effects cannot be applied independently. An onboard shortcut system lets you control the lighting. The DPI button and right click disables and enables the LEDs, while the DPI toggle coupled with a scroll wheel click changes between solid colour effect and the colour cycling mode. Lastly, the DPI button paired with the back button lets you change the speed of the colour cycle or the colour of the lighting when in static mode.

Conclusion

When you're getting a gaming keyboard and mouse for £50, there are always going to be compromises. For the most part, Cooler Master does a good job managing these. The keyboard offers a decent typing experience given its membrane roots, and the lighting features, gaming mode, media keys and build quality (including splash resistance) are all pleasing to see. Meanwhile, the mouse is a solid little unit, offering good tracking, a decent action on the main buttons and even a bit of RGB lighting too. We also like that Cooler Master has gone for an understated aesthetic on both peripherals rather than a plastic fantastic 'gaming' look.

Cooler Master MasterKeys Lite L Combo RGB Review
Click to enlarge

Selling the keyboard and mouse together as a combination is also a good idea, we feel – it gives customers the satisfaction of having peripherals that match (and can still be customised looks wise thanks to the RGB credentials) and there's just less hassle involved in the purchasing. If £50 is your limit for a gaming keyboard and mouse, the MasterKeys Lite L Combo RGB is definitely compelling, and there aren't a whole lot of other options – we certainly haven't seen something in this price category for a long time, which does make the judging process a little more difficult. Overall, we expect most users would be happy with this purchase, but the occasional issue with ghosting on the keyboard and the back button on the mouse not always actuating means this combo, while very good value, just misses out on an award.
Discuss this in the forums
Corsair HS60 Haptic Headset Review

October 15 2020 | 14:00

TOP STORIES

SUGGESTED FOR YOU